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 Your Best Guide to Forex Scalping in 2020 • Benzinga

Your Best Guide to Forex Scalping in 2020 • Benzinga

Are you a newbie? Want to know what are your choices in the Forex market? Then here is it. #daytradingmethods #forexmarket #investment #momentumtrading #trend #scalping #reversetrading #pricemoves #traderpulse

Are you a newbie? Want to know what are your choices in the Forex market? Then here is it. #daytradingmethods #forexmarket #investment #momentumtrading #trend #scalping #reversetrading #pricemoves #traderpulse submitted by traderpulse to u/traderpulse [link] [comments]

What is the best time frames to trade patterns in forex? Swing or Scalping?

I am currently in the transition of determining if I am a scalper or swing trader and I love to trade patterns and I am having trouble finding the perfect time frames, I also use tick data and love it more then time data and if you have an answer for that it would be appreciated!
submitted by JoJoPack0314 to Forex [link] [comments]

Tripling my accounts equity in 3 months!

Tripling my accounts equity in 3 months!
Hey Daytrading,
I'm a 19 year old uni student, currently studying quite a bit of mathematics and weirdly enough majoring in Physiology, and was introduced to trading at 15, I used to "trade" with my dad back then, however he was trading with a market maker at the time and he copped a net $30000 loss. I have had a successful history paper trading since , and 3 months ago decided to tackle trading with real money, and have more than tripled my accounts earnings. I have also attached proof of my first and final trade, and a brief account summary.
So about 8 months ago, I posted a question on this subreddit, asking whether "scalping indices was as easy as it seems?", at the time I was trading on a $50,000 demo account and was making consistent profits of at least 10% on the days I would trade, however I was quite skeptical of the large returns, and questioned this rapid success on this subreddit.
Regardless, after this prolonged period of demo trading, I had saved up $5000 to open up a trading account (with an ECN/STP broker btw), to test the waters trading real money, and to see if I could replicate this success in a real trading account. I did.
On the first day, I made $900, with no losing positions, this initial success got to my head and I entered a few losing trades the following days of that week, however in the end resulted positive. Long story short in the span of 3 months my $5000 account grew to now almost $27000 (also notable, I did deposit an extra $4000 at one point to maintain a decent margin level after a big losing trade), and more than 80% of the positions i have opened have been in the green, with consistent profits weekly.
As indicated by my post 8 months ago, I mainly scalp index CFD's, however trading with real money, I have found myself keeping positions a bit longer than what a scalper would. I have stayed away from Forex, and have attempted to trade Amazon and Tesla.
I'm probably going to continue trading and hopefully continue my account growth. I am planning to day trade with a 30k account and withdrawing profits weekly. I am 19 and a career trading is looking more like an option for me. I'm really trying to get a job or internship at a trading firm, because I believe that would be an invaluable experience, and could possibly kickstart a career for me in trading.
Anyways, I hope i didn't come off as arrogant or boastful, I just wanted to share my personal experience trading.
TL;DR: Started with a $5000 trading account, which I grew to $26000 in 3 months, by mainly day trading index CFD's and a little bit of stock CFD's. Attached proof.
https://preview.redd.it/6tss47h77ql51.jpg?width=828&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=8b159f9997cfb806942a6e3bdc7b076209fa183f


https://preview.redd.it/jny8byga8ql51.png?width=828&format=png&auto=webp&s=b4b1c51a598d472e2ea76f7077ba89c53e3f947a
EDIT: I haven’t been trading stocks guys, i thought i made it clear that my my main strategy was scalping indices, my post 8 months ago on this subreddit was literally asking why i found “scalping indices so easy”, so the argument that I’ve just gotten lucky these past 3 months is redundant, 8 months ago the market was completely different to what it is now, regardless I havent even been trading stocks (less than 5% of my profits are from stocks) Also, yeh i dont use stop losses, come at me 🤣
submitted by MohamedBR to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3
Welcome to the third and final part of this chapter.
Thank you all for the 100s of comments and upvotes - maybe this post will take us above 1,000 for this topic!
Keep any feedback or questions coming in the replies below.
Before you read this note, please start with Part I and then Part II so it hangs together and makes sense.
Part III
  • Squeezes and other risks
  • Market positioning
  • Bet correlation
  • Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

Squeezes and other risks

We are going to cover three common risks that traders face: events; squeezes, asymmetric bets.

Events

Economic releases can cause large short-term volatility. The most famous is Non Farm Payrolls, which is the most widely watched measure of US employment levels and affects the price of many instruments.On an NFP announcement currencies like EURUSD might jump (or drop) 100 pips no problem.
This is fine and there are trading strategies that one may employ around this but the key thing is to be aware of these releases.You can find economic calendars all over the internet - including on this site - and you need only check if there are any major releases each day or week.
For example, if you are trading off some intraday chart and scalping a few pips here and there it would be highly sensible to go into a known data release flat as it is pure coin-toss and not the reason for your trading. It only takes five minutes each day to plan for the day ahead so do not get caught out by this. Many retail traders get stopped out on such events when price volatility is at its peak.

Squeezes

Short squeezes bring a lot of danger and perhaps some opportunity.
The story of VW and Porsche is the best short squeeze ever. Throughout these articles we've used FX examples wherever possible but in this one instance the concept (which is also highly relevant in FX) is best illustrated with an historical lesson from a different asset class.
A short squeeze is when a participant ends up in a short position they are forced to cover. Especially when the rest of the market knows that this participant can be bullied into stopping out at terrible levels, provided the market can briefly drive the price into their pain zone.

There's a reason for the car, don't worry
Hedge funds had been shorting VW stock. However the amount of VW stock available to buy in the open market was actually quite limited. The local government owned a chunk and Porsche itself had bought and locked away around 30%. Neither of these would sell to the hedge-funds so a good amount of the stock was un-buyable at any price.
If you sell or short a stock you must be prepared to buy it back to go flat at some point.
To cut a long story short, Porsche bought a lot of call options on VW stock. These options gave them the right to purchase VW stock from banks at slightly above market price.
Eventually the banks who had sold these options realised there was no VW stock to go out and buy since the German government wouldn’t sell its allocation and Porsche wouldn’t either. If Porsche called in the options the banks were in trouble.
Porsche called in the options which forced the shorts to buy stock - at whatever price they could get it.
The price squeezed higher as those that were short got massively squeezed and stopped out. For one brief moment in 2008, VW was the world’s most valuable company. Shorts were burned hard.

Incredible event
Porsche apparently made $11.5 billion on the trade. The BBC described Porsche as “a hedge fund with a carmaker attached.”
If this all seems exotic then know that the same thing happens in FX all the time. If everyone in the market is talking about a key level in EURUSD being 1.2050 then you can bet the market will try to push through 1.2050 just to take out any short stops at that level. Whether it then rallies higher or fails and trades back lower is a different matter entirely.
This brings us on to the matter of crowded trades. We will look at positioning in more detail in the next section. Crowded trades are dangerous for PNL. If everyone believes EURUSD is going down and has already sold EURUSD then you run the risk of a short squeeze.
For additional selling to take place you need a very good reason for people to add to their position whereas a move in the other direction could force mass buying to cover their shorts.
A trading mentor when I worked at the investment bank once advised me:
Always think about which move would cause the maximum people the maximum pain. That move is precisely what you should be watching out for at all times.

Asymmetric losses

Also known as picking up pennies in front of a steamroller. This risk has caught out many a retail trader. Sometimes it is referred to as a "negative skew" strategy.
Ideally what you are looking for is asymmetric risk trade set-ups: that is where the downside is clearly defined and smaller than the upside. What you want to avoid is the opposite.
A famous example of this going wrong was the Swiss National Bank de-peg in 2012.
The Swiss National Bank had said they would defend the price of EURCHF so that it did not go below 1.2. Many people believed it could never go below 1.2 due to this. Many retail traders therefore opted for a strategy that some describe as ‘picking up pennies in front of a steam-roller’.
They would would buy EURCHF above the peg level and hope for a tiny rally of several pips before selling them back and keep doing this repeatedly. Often they were highly leveraged at 100:1 so that they could amplify the profit of the tiny 5-10 pip rally.
Then this happened.

Something that changed FX markets forever
The SNB suddenly did the unthinkable. They stopped defending the price. CHF jumped and so EURCHF (the number of CHF per 1 EUR) dropped to new lows very fast. Clearly, this trade had horrific risk : reward asymmetry: you risked 30% to make 0.05%.
Other strategies like naively selling options have the same result. You win a small amount of money each day and then spectacularly blow up at some point down the line.

Market positioning

We have talked about short squeezes. But how do you know what the market position is? And should you care?
Let’s start with the first. You should definitely care.
Let’s imagine the entire market is exceptionally long EURUSD and positioning reaches extreme levels. This makes EURUSD very vulnerable.
To keep the price going higher EURUSD needs to attract fresh buy orders. If everyone is already long and has no room to add, what can incentivise people to keep buying? The news flow might be good. They may believe EURUSD goes higher. But they have already bought and have their maximum position on.
On the flip side, if there’s an unexpected event and EURUSD gaps lower you will have the entire market trying to exit the position at the same time. Like a herd of cows running through a single doorway. Messy.
We are going to look at this in more detail in a later chapter, where we discuss ‘carry’ trades. For now this TRYJPY chart might provide some idea of what a rush to the exits of a crowded position looks like.

A carry trade position clear-out in action
Knowing if the market is currently at extreme levels of long or short can therefore be helpful.
The CFTC makes available a weekly report, which details the overall positions of speculative traders “Non Commercial Traders” in some of the major futures products. This includes futures tied to deliverable FX pairs such as EURUSD as well as products such as gold. The report is called “CFTC Commitments of Traders” ("COT").
This is a great benchmark. It is far more representative of the overall market than the proprietary ones offered by retail brokers as it covers a far larger cross-section of the institutional market.
Generally market participants will not pay a lot of attention to commercial hedgers, which are also detailed in the report. This data is worth tracking but these folks are simply hedging real-world transactions rather than speculating so their activity is far less revealing and far more noisy.
You can find the data online for free and download it directly here.

Raw format is kinda hard to work with

However, many websites will chart this for you free of charge and you may find it more convenient to look at it that way. Just google “CFTC positioning charts”.

But you can easily get visualisations
You can visually spot extreme positioning. It is extremely powerful.
Bear in mind the reports come out Friday afternoon US time and the report is a snapshot up to the prior Tuesday. That means it is a lagged report - by the time it is released it is a few days out of date. For longer term trades where you hold positions for weeks this is of course still pretty helpful information.
As well as the absolute level (is the speculative market net long or short) you can also use this to pick up on changes in positioning.
For example if bad news comes out how much does the net short increase? If good news comes out, the market may remain net short but how much did they buy back?
A lot of traders ask themselves “Does the market have this trade on?” The positioning data is a good method for answering this. It provides a good finger on the pulse of the wider market sentiment and activity.
For example you might say: “There was lots of noise about the good employment numbers in the US. However, there wasn’t actually a lot of position change on the back of it. Maybe everyone who wants to buy already has. What would happen now if bad news came out?”
In general traders will be wary of entering a crowded position because it will be hard to attract additional buyers or sellers and there could be an aggressive exit.
If you want to enter a trade that is showing extreme levels of positioning you must think carefully about this dynamic.

Bet correlation

Retail traders often drastically underestimate how correlated their bets are.
Through bitter experience, I have learned that a mistake in position correlation is the root of some of the most serious problems in trading. If you have eight highly correlated positions, then you are really trading one position that is eight times as large.
Bruce Kovner of hedge fund, Caxton Associates
For example, if you are trading a bunch of pairs against the USD you will end up with a simply huge USD exposure. A single USD-trigger can ruin all your bets. Your ideal scenario — and it isn’t always possible — would be to have a highly diversified portfolio of bets that do not move in tandem.
Look at this chart. Inverted USD index (DXY) is green. AUDUSD is orange. EURUSD is blue.

Chart from TradingView
So the whole thing is just one big USD trade! If you are long AUDUSD, long EURUSD, and short DXY you have three anti USD bets that are all likely to work or fail together.
The more diversified your portfolio of bets are, the more risk you can take on each.
There’s a really good video, explaining the benefits of diversification from Ray Dalio.
A systematic fund with access to an investable universe of 10,000 instruments has more opportunity to make a better risk-adjusted return than a trader who only focuses on three symbols. Diversification really is the closest thing to a free lunch in finance.
But let’s be pragmatic and realistic. Human retail traders don’t have capacity to run even one hundred bets at a time. More realistic would be an average of 2-3 trades on simultaneously. So what can be done?
For example:
  • You might diversify across time horizons by having a mix of short-term and long-term trades.
  • You might diversify across asset classes - trading some FX but also crypto and equities.
  • You might diversify your trade generation approach so you are not relying on the same indicators or drivers on each trade.
  • You might diversify your exposure to the market regime by having some trades that assume a trend will continue (momentum) and some that assume we will be range-bound (carry).
And so on. Basically you want to scan your portfolio of trades and make sure you are not putting all your eggs in one basket. If some trades underperform others will perform - assuming the bets are not correlated - and that way you can ensure your overall portfolio takes less risk per unit of return.
The key thing is to start thinking about a portfolio of bets and what each new trade offers to your existing portfolio of risk. Will it diversify or amplify a current exposure?

Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

One common mistake is to get bored and restless and put on crap trades. This just means trades in which you have low conviction.
It is perfectly fine not to trade. If you feel like you do not understand the market at a particular point, simply choose not to trade.
Flat is a position.
Do not waste your bullets on rubbish trades. Only enter a trade when you have carefully considered it from all angles and feel good about the risk. This will make it far easier to hold onto the trade if it moves against you at any point. You actually believe in it.
Equally, you need to set monthly limits. A standard limit might be a 10% account balance stop per month. At that point you close all your positions immediately and stop trading till next month.

Be strict with yourself and walk away
Let’s assume you started the year with $100k and made 5% in January so enter Feb with $105k balance. Your stop is therefore 10% of $105k or $10.5k . If your account balance dips to $94.5k ($105k-$10.5k) then you stop yourself out and don’t resume trading till March the first.
Having monthly calendar breaks is nice for another reason. Say you made a load of money in January. You don’t want to start February feeling you are up 5% or it is too tempting to avoid trading all month and protect the existing win. Each month and each year should feel like a clean slate and an independent period.
Everyone has trading slumps. It is perfectly normal. It will definitely happen to you at some stage. The trick is to take a break and refocus. Conserve your capital by not trading a lot whilst you are on a losing streak. This period will be much harder for you emotionally and you’ll end up making suboptimal decisions. An enforced break will help you see the bigger picture.
Put in place a process before you start trading and then it’ll be easy to follow and will feel much less emotional. Remember: the market doesn’t care if you win or lose, it is nothing personal.
When your head has cooled and you feel calm you return the next month and begin the task of building back your account balance.

That's a wrap on risk management

Thanks for taking time to read this three-part chapter on risk management. I hope you enjoyed it. Do comment in the replies if you have any questions or feedback.
Remember: the most important part of trading is not making money. It is not losing money. Always start with that principle. I hope these three notes have provided some food for thought on how you might approach risk management and are of practical use to you when trading. Avoiding mistakes is not a sexy tagline but it is an effective and reliable way to improve results.
Next up I will be writing about an exciting topic I think many traders should look at rather differently: news trading. Please follow on here to receive notifications and the broad outline is below.
News Trading Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use the economic calendar
  • Reading the economic calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Interest rates
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking
News Trading Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The mysterious 'position trim' effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
***

Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

The comedy how I lost all my money in two hours

I'm trading for 11 months with pretty good success.
I never traded metals and forex before, just stocks. Today when gold started to consolidate at the last hour, I decided to scalp short it with a large amount, so I opened 100 lots. I haven't realised, in forex 100 (lots) doesn't mean "100 pcs", because I used to stocks and I went full retard without knowledge.
Seconds later, I realised it means 10 million dollars (1 lot = 100.000, and I had 500x leverage).
It moved up a bit and immediately I was down £4000. I scared as fuck and rather than closing the position quickly I hoped maybe I could close break even.
The market closed, and I waited for the Asian session. The gold popped like never before, and I lost all my life savings (£55000) in less than two hours. (including the 1-hour break between sessions).
If I count that I lost all my earnings as well, I lost around £85000.
Here is the margin call
https://imgur.com/a/XY5m4ZA
https://imgur.com/a/VSgmCSs
https://imgur.com/pRWl5g9
IC Markets closed my position partially in every 1-2 minutes until I shut it myself at £35.
You know the rest of the story. I'm depressed, crying and shouting with myself.
Yes, I know I was stupid, thanks. I just wanted to share this with you.



Edit: WOW THANK YOU, GUYS! I haven't expected this, but you help me.
Many of you asked the same questions, I answer it here:
- I live in Europe, and we usually trade CFD's, not futures.
- Currency in GBP.
- As you can see, this account made on IC Markets. They not just allowing you a 500x leverage, it's the default.
- You can ask me why I went against the market. Because gold is way oversold? Because I expected institutions would sell their shares before gold is hitting £2000, leaving retails hanging there. Also, as I said, I wanted to scalp, not riding the gold all the way down. If I had a loss of £100, I would close the position immediately. But when I saw the £4000, my heart is stopped, and my brain just freezes.
- I went for a revenge trade with my last £2k, and I don't have to say what happened. I uninstalled the app, and I give up trading for a while.
- Again, in the past months, I was cautious, I lost a significant sum in March, but I managed to recover. Made consistent gains, always with SL. This is just an example of how easy is to fuck up everything you did.
- I didn't come here for some shiny digital medals. I can't tell about my losses to anyone who I know in real life. I would make a fool of myself.
- Anyone who attacking me that it is a scam. Well, think what you want. I feel terrible and the last thing is to answer all the messages saying "You fucking karma whore". I don't give a shit about karma.

submitted by fail0verflowf9 to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

I'm new in this and I have some questions

1 - What is exactly the inactivity fee that can be found in some brokers? This is confusing to me because I don't know what they mean by 'inactivty'? Do I have to pay the fee only if I'm not buying anything, or not selling? Or both?
2 - What is the time an operation has to be held to be considered scalping? Less than 5 minutes? Some brokers like Trading 212 and eToro don't allow scalping, but don't specify where is the limit.
3 - Is the swap/overnight fee only a CFD thing? If I trade stocks/forex without any CFD do I have to pay it too?
4 - In general, when I buy/sell in a broker, are the trade commissions already added to the price that I see when I buy/sell?
5 - Even with no withdrawal fees, if I withdraw money to a paypal account, I have to pay paypal fees when I receive the money, right?
submitted by EduEpsilon to Trading [link] [comments]

Just some inspirations / reminders on strategy development

I just talk about really major pairs like EURUSD, USDJPY, etc.
Forget about catching a trend, if you wanna trade trends, commodities, stocks, index funds trend way better, a lot more opportunities than forex. Major currencies range at least 70% of the time, if not more. Learn how to make money from ranging markets and hold a trend once you catch it.
The biggest purpose of currency is for settling transactions, not for scalping profits. That's why it doesn't trend (aka remaining stable). Stability is why a currency being "major".
Therefore most indicators don't work well with these currencies because first they are not designed for forex, second most of them only tell trends or overbought/oversold. Unless you are Soros or central banks etc no major currency can be overbought or oversold.
Take advantage of "fakeout" (I still wonder if it's the right way to call it so, Trump's Tweets are one of the sources IMO). Accept the fact that it happens and think about how to profit from it. Market makers and big banks are also just market players, even though very much bigger, they are also profiting from each other. If you can't beat them, join them.
Choppy market is still better than a still market.
No market maker cares about support or resistance. Like no insider or institutional money (i mean human not machines) would spend hours and hours on charts drawing trend lines before they place an order. Why would you?
Planning how to react in different scenarios after a position is opened is much better than trying to act like a crystal ball by looking at history when you trade something that ranges most of the time. The moment you observe a trend, chances are the trend is (almost) over. Even if things are against you, most of the time you can turn it to break even without using lots of margin. (Most news are just as big as baby's cough.)
But still, very few news are really big (911, fukushima, brexit, covid, name it), don't ignore the news completely.
Money management is very important. Most traders (of course including many of those on reddit) just talk about how to make an entry but seldom talk about how to manage an already open position or how to close a trade. The latter is way more important than the former.
Besides japanese candlesticks, there are a lot more charting options out there.
Be creative and know what you are trading to the deepest !
submitted by cindyhont to Forex [link] [comments]

Summarizing some free trading idea resources I've been using

I've been following many free resources on youtube and twitter to generate trading ideas. Some of them are suspicious; some are more like boasting their wining trades but never post any losing trades. I see many people ask about trading ideas/resources, so I want to briefly share some resources I find useful.

Twitter resources:
  1. @ TicTocTick


  1. @ tradingwarz


  1. @ traderstewie


Youtube resources:
  1. Conquer trading and investing. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN2WmKUchJpIcS1MupY-BuA


  1. Blaze Capital: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq0BCGckWWjrnV8YdYO24JA
Other notes:
  1. The scalping trades in the morning is not very suitable for small accounts since they will trade for example 100 shares of BA (~160) to scalp a few dollars per share.
  2. Even though the stocks on their weekly watchlist does well very, one still need to come up with an actionable plan. Very often say they recommend stock A on Sunday, and on Monday it already gaps up big. They sometimes do YOLO options -- big risk big rewards-- options can go to 0.
  3. Besides the free content, everyone can get a free one-week trial for their paid membership, or a 2-week free trial by winning a lottery game on their youtube ( what I did) or knowing someone in their group and get a referral. What I like about the group: (i) very frequently updates each day on SPY and stocks on the watchlist. (ii) all their positions, Profit / Loss are very transparent. I learned a lot about how to manage trades by observing their live trades. (iii) There are many very experienced traders in the group posting their trading ideas, plans, entry/exit, and there are many live discussions. (iv) There's a "helpdesk" in the group where members' questions will be answered in minutes. I often ask about my trading plan, entries/ targets.




Other resources:
  1. Shadow trader free newsletter
https://www.shadowtrader.net/newsletter-category/swing-trade


I've spent much time looking for free contents, and I like the ones above. Also looking forward to hearing about other good/bad resources. I might also update this post if there are enough interests. NFA
submitted by Busy-Valuable to Daytrading [link] [comments]

I'm new in this and I have some questions

1 - What is exactly the inactivity fee that can be found in some brokers? This is confusing to me because I don't know what they mean by 'inactivty'? Do I have to pay the fee only if I'm not buying anything, or not selling? Or both?
2 - What is the time an operation has to be held to be considered scalping? Less than 5 minutes? Some brokers like Trading 212 and eToro don't allow scalping, but don't specify where is the limit.
3 - Is the swap/overnight fee only a CFD thing? If I trade stocks/forex without any CFD do I have to pay it too?
4 - In general, when I buy/sell in a broker, are the trade commissions already added to the price that I see when I buy/sell?
5 - Even with no withdrawal fees, if I withdraw money to a paypal account, I have to pay paypal fees when I receive the money, right?
submitted by EduEpsilon to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Market orders get filled at wrong price (Forex)

Market orders get filled at wrong price (Forex)
Hello everybody, rookie question here.
Been trying to learn scalping so I'm practising on a demo account. I have opened a demo account at forex.com and connected that broker to tradingview so I can buy and sell directly in Tradingview.
I use Heikin Ashi bars, so I enter on these bars.
However, when I did a market sell, my orders got filled at a price further away from the actual price. I am aware of slippage, I will show a picture, but this doesn't seem like a slippage to me but I could be wrong.
This is the USD/JPY pair, 5 min bars.
What am I missing here?
Also, would you recommend a specifik broker or platform to use when scalping, maybe to get better real time data or faster order execution?
Thanks in advance!
https://preview.redd.it/tehb7aclyhk51.jpg?width=846&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9efdc0f3821b1f35984f1f293293fd209277bc38
submitted by Mobile-War to Forex [link] [comments]

Scalping: Futures vs Forex

I'm curious if anyone here has endeavored in scalping at both markets and what are your thoughts in the whole thing.
If your strategy is based on price action and/or DOM, and you only stay in the trade for a few minutes, then in theory all you should care about is liquidity and commissions.
Wondering how things really are in practice.
 
Disclaimer: so far I have only scalped options. But I'm thinking on moving to either futures or forex. The reason being liquidity.
I recently opened a forex account, although it's still unfunded. However, being in the EU and all, I don't know how easy, or if possible, is to open an account with those fancy futures brokers.
submitted by money_kat to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Scalping and FX market. Is it viable long term? Fees eating up most of my profits

Hey guys, Just wanted to ask what brokers do you guys use for scalping with low fees?
Scalping as a strategy really appeals to my personality and am utilizing a strategy that has a pretty high win % at 5pips per trade. Unfortunately however the spread + commission on most brokers just seems to be such an uphill battle. I give up anywhere around 10-40% of my profits on spread + commission and just further accentuates my losses. As a result, it just doesn't seem viable in the long term. Am i missing something here?
Is scalping even profitable in the forex market? are there other markets with lower cost structures that are more viable for scalping? Futures perhaps?
Would really appreciate some of you more experienced traders to advise me here, i'm open to any suggestions.
Thanks alot :)
edit: i am from Australlia and am currently using Pepperstone razor account and primarily scalp the major usd pairs cause of the low spreads
submitted by 5Finger_discount to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex Scalping Indicators MT4


The Forex Scalping Indicators MT4 is very meant to help analyze short-term price fluctuations. It's one of the very extensively used by many active traders on the volume indicator mt4 market for the Meta Trader platform. For the long-term investors, the scalping indicator might help determine good points to enter or exit by helping in speculating on future price levels or trends through the proper evaluation of past patterns.

The Meta Trader 4 is really a Forex indicator developed utilizing the MQL4 programming language. It can be used to create manual Forex trading strategies. Meta Trader 4 indicators may be categorized into several groups - general purpose, multi- time period, divergence, statistical, and free foreign exchange indicators. These may be downloaded online which will give you a chance to test them before actual deployment on the Meta Trader platform. Additional alerts for the MT4 indicator may be put set up including email, sound, and pop-up alerts.

Choosing the Right Forex Scalping Indicators

There are several factors that need to be considered when selecting the correct Forex scalping indicators MT4 to use. For starters, divergence indicators are generally most accurate in flat Forex markets the same as other oscillators. They are therefore advisable to utilize with MT4 indicators when determining the possible direction the Forex market will go. There's also specific indicators that work best with MT4 for various purposes such as Forex scalping, intraday trading, and even for long-term Forex trading strategies.

Recommended is to judge various Forex indicators from different sources and try them out on the Meta Trader platform. Using several divergence indicators in conjunction with the indicators of Forex market tendencies might help clean up an enter signal and allow it to be possible to secure a great position in a trending market.

The Great things about Meta Trader 4 Indicators

One a valuable thing about these MT4 indicators is they include source code in MQ4 file format. This means you can break it down and manually analyze what it is supposed to complete, and make adjustments when necessary. Likewise, the Forex scalping indicators have already been tested by experienced professional Forex traders. The indicators aren't rehashed and they employ proven mathematical algorithms in the program. Additional alerts may also be available and can certainly be installed if required.

The Forex Scalping Strategy

A lot of trades work for only some minutes, less than a minute even in some instances, and the targets are normally from 5 to 15 pips. The concept is to obtain in and out with some profits wherever possible, and to immediately get free from bad positions to get ready for future trades. Experienced day traders who use a relatively longer time period use the same Forex scalping indicators MT4 within their trading strategy. The reason being it is user friendly and doesn't present a lot of complications which really is a a valuable thing as you don't intend to stay long in the trading market for long periods at a time. In this way, you will have a way to optimize gains while at the same time frame minimize your losses from losing trades.
submitted by sterlin718 to u/sterlin718 [link] [comments]

Any Luck with Ninjascript?

Hey guys, A little about me - I've been writing algos on and off for about a year and a half now. I started with Quantopian way back using python to write stock algos, then realised I couldn't live trade with it, so that put me off that.
I then found MT4 and MetaEditor and the world of forex... I was immediately in love with the simplicity of the language (C#), but I ditched it because forex just felt impossible to code around with all the volatility and news based price action. (I'm sure there's exceptions to this - but does anyone have a similar experience with it?)
I finally landed on NinjaTrader and scalping futures, which is amazing and seems to fit way better.
I'm wondering if anyone has experiences with successful Ninjascript trading systems and what advice they have etc. I've written up a few, one with a 76% success rate over 50 days but I'm starting to see how commission and tax really can have an impact...I'd also like to know about the reliability of backtesting using the Strategy Analyser vs Market Replay...
Who's out there! :)
submitted by photoshoplad to algotrading [link] [comments]

I'm a strategy lover and it's a real problem now

Hi everyone,
I have been learning about Forex for almost 2 years now.
But I have a real problem. I am a strategy lover. I hop from one strategy to another due to various reasons.
How it works: 1. I find a strategy 2. I fall in love with it 3. I learn about it, backtest it, demo trade it, etc. 4. I find something to nitpick 5. Leave the strategy and go back to point 1
In the past 2 years, I must have burned through over 20-30 strategies. I have gone through scalping, swing trading, full discretionary trading, full system based trading, half discretionary and half system based strategies, etc
I just can't seem to stick with a strategy after the honeymoon phase. Either I get tired of the strategy, or backtesting reveals it isnt profitable, or it too discretionary, or it is too system based, etc.
Once again, I left another strategy and am going back to point 1, finding a new strategy. I found a new strategy, which is the one posted by ParallaxFX. Already 2 people have backtested it and it was profitable. But even with this information, I know that I will go through the strategy, I will love it at first, I will test, then ultimately I wont stick with it and then leave it and then go back to point 1.
I like the fact it is mostly a system based strategy and lately I have tested a lot of strategies that are 50% system based and 50% discretionary. The only thing I have learned so far is that I would probably be more comfortable trading a system based strategy rather than a full discretionary one.
This is a big issue for me always and I dont know how to overcome it. It was fine in the beginning because I was a new trader and to go through strategies is just part of trading in the beginning. But now it's been almost 2 years and I have to admit now that I have a real problem that needs to be addressed. Otherwise at this rate, I will still be doing this in 5-10 years.
It seems like most people find a strategy and stick with it, but then struggle with risk management. But I'm stuck at the strategy part and I cant progress.
How do I overcome this? What steps can I take so this doesn't happen? Do I need a mentor at this point?
Any help is welcome!
submitted by forexguyz643 to Forex [link] [comments]

Getting bored while waiting for setup

I "scalp" (idk if I could use that since my aim is always 15-20 pips) in the 5-min chart and my strategy involves breakouts. It is fairly successful and I can always get out with minimum loss but it is incredibly boring while waiting for it. It could take a lot of hours waiting for the setup and it is very tiring to look at the chart senselessly.
Forex, what do you do when bored? What are your hobbies? What do you do while watching the charts?
submitted by coldheartedsnob to Forex [link] [comments]

I am currently happy with my Forex trading (examples in comments). I'm wanting to expand to stocks but I feel lost.

I am currently happy with my Forex trading (examples in comments). I'm wanting to expand to stocks but I feel lost.
TL;DR I feel brand new to day trading anything other than currencies and I'm having trouble finding the right resources to get started. Help? Will trade answers regarding trend trading.
Hey folks,
I've been involved in Forex for about 6-7 years now. Light bulb moment happened right around 2 years ago and I'm content with the growth rate of my account since then. I trade very, very simply. I look for established trends on higher timeframes (8h, 12h, daily, weekly), wait for a pullback, and then enter with fib retracements and supp/resistance on what I perceive as momentum. The moving average serves no technical purpose. It's simply a different type of visual representation of price movement. There's nothing revolutionary here.
eurjpy example
https://preview.redd.it/hmko1b2t3id51.png?width=624&format=png&auto=webp&s=56ecf58261f211f7e7f6468507ce7a0edce779b3
audusd examples:
https://preview.redd.it/rkifv53v3id51.png?width=774&format=png&auto=webp&s=315f2b381c7240cbcc23f49944f356faa8d4c5ef
nzdcad
https://preview.redd.it/uuzcshs4aid51.png?width=601&format=png&auto=webp&s=bbf806a28f5fe2bddf5e630da7f7d3f744ee9084
I want to expand into day trading but again, I feel lost. Small cap? Large cap? Reading tape? Scrapers? Volume aggregation? stock scanning scripts? Runners? Bag holding? Apparently shorting is a big deal? Penny stocks compared to "normal" stocks? which brokers offer what? ALSO, some of these charts feel chaotic at best. The choppiness just appears unreal. Price action in Forex can be choppy, but at least it's "smooth" in the sense that price opens at the same price the previous candle closed at 99% of the time.
It doesn't really help that most of the youtube resources I've come across focus on getting rich quick, or aspects of trading that I do believe are important (psychology, money management, FOMO, indicators, etc.) but I do not need help with. I'm still improving, but I've got a solid grip on these aspects and they are not what I'm looking for. I guess what I'm looking for specifically is information on the nuances, technicals, vernacular, and details that are inherent in day trading stocks that don't exist in forex. Most of the stuff I listed in the above paragraph are accurate examples.
I have zero interest in scalping Forex. I'm active duty with a full time day job which is part of the reason I strictly trade higher time frames. I've also found that the manner in which I prefer to trade is more reliable at higher time frames. That being said I am interested in getting into stocks as well as Forex and will have the option to move to second shift and trade the morning bell and all the liquidity that comes with it in the next couple months. I'm looking to get educated in the interim. It's likely that I'll eventually move into long-term trading with stocks as well, but who knows.
Does anyone have any resources or suggestions for materials that touch on topics similar to what's listed above that they found helpful when first jumping in? I'm looking for the option to trade stocks, commodities, penny stocks, etc.
Oh, I currently trade with Oanda through Tradingview and I'm considering TDAmeritrade. I can get around the PDT rule but I'm not in a hurry and would probably like to start with penny stocks with something like $5-10k I think? The problem is I'm just unsure. My personal philosophy is that demo trading is useless after buttonology. Instead I have found that trading small amounts of real money provides much better results in the long term.
submitted by Broggernaut to Howtotrade [link] [comments]

New to trading but only interested in crypto.

I started this journey for forex but found a crypto scalping strategy due to volatility in crypto allowing me to trade less. I want to scalp crypto, I’m in the US. What US broker allows this, are there non-US brokers that take US clients? Suggestions welcomed.
Also, I just want to trade crypto, but is this necessarily CFD crypto trading? If it is, is there a way to do this as a US client or do I need an overseas entity/account? If I need the latter, how do I go about gettin it?
submitted by HERE_2_LURN to Daytrading [link] [comments]

Trading economic news

The majority of this sub is focused on technical analysis. I regularly ridicule such "tea leaf readers" and advocate for trading based on fundamentals and economic news instead, so I figured I should take the time to write up something on how exactly you can trade economic news releases.
This post is long as balls so I won't be upset if you get bored and go back to your drooping dick patterns or whatever.

How economic news is released

First, it helps to know how economic news is compiled and released. Let's take Initial Jobless Claims, the number of initial claims for unemployment benefits around the United States from Sunday through Saturday. Initial in this context means the first claim for benefits made by an individual during a particular stretch of unemployment. The Initial Jobless Claims figure appears in the Department of Labor's Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report, which compiles information from all of the per-state departments that report to the DOL during the week. A typical number is between 100k and 250k and it can vary quite significantly week-to-week.
The Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report contains data that lags 5 days behind. For example, the Report issued on Thursday March 26th 2020 contained data about the week ending on Saturday March 21st 2020.
In the days leading up to the Report, financial companies will survey economists and run complicated mathematical models to forecast the upcoming Initial Jobless Claims figure. The results of surveyed experts is called the "consensus"; specific companies, experts, and websites will also provide their own forecasts. Different companies will release different consensuses. Usually they are pretty close (within 2-3k), but for last week's record-high Initial Jobless Claims the reported consensuses varied by up to 1M! In other words, there was essentially no consensus.
The Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report is released each Thursday morning at exactly 8:30 AM ET. (On Thanksgiving the Report is released on Wednesday instead.) Media representatives gather at the Frances Perkins Building in Washington DC and are admitted to the "lockup" at 8:00 AM ET. In order to be admitted to the lockup you have to be a credentialed member of a media organization that has signed the DOL lockup agreement. The lockup room is small so there is a limited number of spots.
No phones are allowed. Reporters bring their laptops and connect to a local network; there is a master switch on the wall that prevents/enables Internet connectivity on this network. Once the doors are closed the Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report is distributed, with a heading that announces it is "embargoed" (not to be released) prior to 8:30 AM. Reporters type up their analyses of the report, including extracting key figures like Initial Jobless Claims. They load their write-ups into their companies' software, which prepares to send it out as soon as Internet is enabled. At 8:30 AM the DOL representative in the room flips the wall switch and all of the laptops are connected to the Internet, releasing their write-ups to their companies and on to their companies' partners.
Many of those media companies have externally accessible APIs for distributing news. Media aggregators and squawk services (like RanSquawk and TradeTheNews) subscribe to all of these different APIs and then redistribute the key economic figures from the Report to their own subscribers within one second after Internet is enabled in the DOL lockup.
Some squawk services are text-based while others are audio-based. FinancialJuice.com provides a free audio squawk service; internally they have a paid subscription to a professional squawk service and they simply read out the latest headlines to their own listeners, subsidized by ads on the site. I've been using it for 4 months now and have been pretty happy. It usually lags behind the official release times by 1-2 seconds and occasionally they verbally flub the numbers or stutter and have to repeat, but you can't beat the price!
Important - I’m not affiliated with FinancialJuice and I’m not advocating that you use them over any other squawk. If you use them and they misspeak a number and you lose all your money don’t blame me. If anybody has any other free alternatives please share them!

How the news affects forex markets

Institutional forex traders subscribe to these squawk services and use custom software to consume the emerging data programmatically and then automatically initiate trades based on the perceived change to the fundamentals that the figures represent.
It's important to note that every institution will have "priced in" their own forecasted figures well in advance of an actual news release. Forecasts and consensuses all come out at different times in the days leading up to a news release, so by the time the news drops everybody is really only looking for an unexpected result. You can't really know what any given institution expects the value to be, but unless someone has inside information you can pretty much assume that the market has collectively priced in the experts' consensus. When the news comes out, institutions will trade based on the difference between the actual and their forecast.
Sometimes the news reflects a real change to the fundamentals with an economic effect that will change the demand for a currency, like an interest rate decision. However, in the case of the Initial Jobless Claims figure, which is a backwards-looking metric, trading is really just self-fulfilling speculation that market participants will buy dollars when unemployment is low and sell dollars when unemployment is high. Generally speaking, news that reflects a real economic shift has a bigger effect than news that only matters to speculators.
Massive and extremely fast news-based trades happen within tenths of a second on the ECNs on which institutional traders are participants. Over the next few seconds the resulting price changes trickle down to retail traders. Some economic news, like Non Farm Payroll Employment, has an effect that can last minutes to hours as "slow money" follows behind on the trend created by the "fast money". Other news, like Initial Jobless Claims, has a short impact that trails off within a couple minutes and is subsequently dwarfed by the usual pseudorandom movements in the market.
The bigger the difference between actual and consensus, the bigger the effect on any given currency pair. Since economic news releases generally relate to a single currency, the biggest and most easily predicted effects are seen on pairs where one currency is directly effected and the other is not affected at all. Personally I trade USD/JPY because the time difference between the US and Japan ensures that no news will be coming out of Japan at the same time that economic news is being released in the US.
Before deciding to trade any particular news release you should measure the historical correlation between the release (specifically, the difference between actual and consensus) and the resulting short-term change in the currency pair. Historical data for various news releases (along with historical consensus data) is readily available. You can pay to get it exported into Excel or whatever, or you can scroll through it for free on websites like TradingEconomics.com.
Let's look at two examples: Initial Jobless Claims and Non Farm Payroll Employment (NFP). I collected historical consensuses and actuals for these releases from January 2018 through the present, measured the "surprise" difference for each, and then correlated that to short-term changes in USD/JPY at the time of release using 5 second candles.
I omitted any releases that occurred simultaneously as another major release. For example, occasionally the monthly Initial Jobless Claims comes out at the exact same time as the monthly Balance of Trade figure, which is a more significant economic indicator and can be expected to dwarf the effect of the Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report.
USD/JPY correlation with Initial Jobless Claims (2018 - present)
USD/JPY correlation with Non Farm Payrolls (2018 - present)
The horizontal axes on these charts is the duration (in seconds) after the news release over which correlation was calculated. The vertical axis is the Pearson correlation coefficient: +1 means that the change in USD/JPY over that duration was perfectly linearly correlated to the "surprise" in the releases; -1 means that the change in USD/JPY was perfectly linearly correlated but in the opposite direction, and 0 means that there is no correlation at all.
For Initial Jobless Claims you can see that for the first 30 seconds USD/JPY is strongly negatively correlated with the difference between consensus and actual jobless claims. That is, fewer-than-forecast jobless claims (fewer newly unemployed people than expected) strengthens the dollar and greater-than-forecast jobless claims (more newly unemployed people than expected) weakens the dollar. Correlation then trails off and changes to a moderate/weak positive correlation. I interpret this as algorithms "buying the dip" and vice versa, but I don't know for sure. From this chart it appears that you could profit by opening a trade for 15 seconds (duration with strongest correlation) that is long USD/JPY when Initial Jobless Claims is lower than the consensus and short USD/JPY when Initial Jobless Claims is higher than expected.
The chart for Non Farm Payroll looks very different. Correlation is positive (higher-than-expected payrolls strengthen the dollar and lower-than-expected payrolls weaken the dollar) and peaks at around 45 seconds, then slowly decreases as time goes on. This implies that price changes due to NFP are quite significant relative to background noise and "stick" even as normal fluctuations pick back up.
I wanted to show an example of what the USD/JPY S5 chart looks like when an "uncontested" (no other major simultaneously news release) Initial Jobless Claims and NFP drops, but unfortunately my broker's charts only go back a week. (I can pull historical data going back years through the API but to make it into a pretty chart would be a bit of work.) If anybody can get a 5-second chart of USD/JPY at March 19, 2020, UTC 12:30 and/or at February 7, 2020, UTC 13:30 let me know and I'll add it here.

Backtesting

So without too much effort we determined that (1) USD/JPY is strongly negatively correlated with the Initial Jobless Claims figure for the first 15 seconds after the release of the Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report (when no other major news is being released) and also that (2) USD/JPY is strongly positively correlated with the Non Farms Payroll figure for the first 45 seconds after the release of the Employment Situation report.
Before you can assume you can profit off the news you have to backtest and consider three important parameters.
Entry speed: How quickly can you realistically enter the trade? The correlation performed above was measured from the exact moment the news was released, but realistically if you've got your finger on the trigger and your ear to the squawk it will take a few seconds to hit "Buy" or "Sell" and confirm. If 90% of the price move happens in the first second you're SOL. For back-testing purposes I assume a 5 second delay. In practice I use custom software that opens a trade with one click, and I can reliably enter a trade within 2-3 seconds after the news drops, using the FinancialJuice free squawk.
Minimum surprise: Should you trade every release or can you do better by only trading those with a big enough "surprise" factor? Backtesting will tell you whether being more selective is better long-term or not.
Hold time: The optimal time to hold the trade is not necessarily the same as the time of maximum correlation. That's a good starting point but it's not necessarily the best number. Backtesting each possible hold time will let you find the best one.
The spread: When you're only holding a position open for 30 seconds, the spread will kill you. The correlations performed above used the midpoint price, but in reality you have to buy at the ask and sell at the bid. Brokers aren't stupid and the moment volume on the ECN jumps they will widen the spread for their retail customers. The only way to determine if the news-driven price movements reliably overcome the spread is to backtest.
Stops: Personally I don't use stops, neither take-profit nor stop-loss, since I'm automatically closing the trade after a fixed (and very short) amount of time. Additionally, brokers have a minimum stop distance; the profits from scalping the news are so slim that even the nearest stops they allow will generally not get triggered.
I backtested trading these two news releases (since 2018), using a 5 second entry delay, real historical spreads, and no stops, cycling through different "surprise" thresholds and hold times to find the combination that returns the highest net profit. It's important to maximize net profit, not expected value per trade, so you don't over-optimize and reduce the total number of trades taken to one single profitable trade. If you want to get fancy you can set up a custom metric that combines number of trades, expected value, and drawdown into a single score to be maximized.
For the Initial Jobless Claims figure I found that the best combination is to hold trades open for 25 seconds (that is, open at 5 seconds elapsed and hold until 30 seconds elapsed) and only trade when the difference between consensus and actual is 7k or higher. That leads to 30 trades taken since 2018 and an expected return of... drumroll please... -0.0093 yen per unit per trade.
Yep, that's a loss of approx. $8.63 per lot.
Disappointing right? That's the spread and that's why you have to backtest. Even though the release of the Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Report has a strong correlation with movement in USD/JPY, it's simply not something that a retail trader can profit from.
Let's turn to the NFP. There I found that the best combination is to hold trades open for 75 seconds (that is, open at 5 seconds elapsed and hold until 80 seconds elapsed) and trade every single NFP (no minimum "surprise" threshold). That leads to 20 trades taken since 2018 and an expected return of... drumroll please... +0.1306 yen per unit per trade.
That's a profit of approx. $121.25 per lot. Not bad for 75 seconds of work! That's a +6% ROI at 50x leverage.

Make it real

If you want to do this for realsies, you need to run these numbers for all of the major economic news releases. Markit Manufacturing PMI, Factory Orders MoM, Trade Balance, PPI MoM, Export and Import Prices, Michigan Consumer Sentiment, Retail Sales MoM, Industrial Production MoM, you get the idea. You keep a list of all of the releases you want to trade, when they are released, and the ideal hold time and "surprise" threshold. A few minutes before the prescribed release time you open up your broker's software, turn on your squawk, maybe jot a few notes about consensuses and model forecasts, and get your finger on the button. At the moment you hear the release you open the trade in the correct direction, hold it (without looking at the chart!) for the required amount of time, then close it and go on with your day.
Some benefits of trading this way: * Most major economic releases come out at either 8:30 AM ET or 10:00 AM ET, and then you're done for the day. * It's easily backtestable. You can look back at the numbers and see exactly what to expect your return to be. * It's fun! Packing your trading into 30 seconds and knowing that institutions are moving billions of dollars around as fast as they can based on the exact same news you just read is thrilling. * You can wow your friends by saying things like "The St. Louis Fed had some interesting remarks on consumer spending in the latest Beige Book." * No crayons involved.
Some downsides: * It's tricky to be fast enough without writing custom software. Some broker software is very slow and requires multiple dialog boxes before a position is opened, which won't cut it. * The profits are very slim, you're not going to impress your instagram followers to join your expensive trade copying service with your 30-second twice-weekly trades. * Any friends you might wow with your boring-ass economic talking points are themselves the most boring people in the world.
I hope you enjoyed this long as fuck post and you give trading economic news a try!
submitted by thicc_dads_club to Forex [link] [comments]

What's everyones opinion of writing price action strategies into a bot

I've been forex trading for a bit and increasingly moving towards purely trading on proce action and indicators.
My question is this: if I'm trading purely based on a price action then are there any cases where manually trading is better than writing a bot to do it? Seems like me sitting there and doing the trades only increases room for error. What's everyones thoughts in this? Are there cases where a human ca n follow strategies better? Thinking more in terms of scalping/day trading
submitted by legalrock to Forex [link] [comments]

Detailed Monday scalp explanation!

Detailed Monday scalp explanation!
Dear Traders
Most people know me by now I'm the guy with the 10 pips that always put the same song in the video, because I just love it too much. haha
Well let's get down to business unfortunately I was too tired to write the explanation post yesterday, but it doesn't matter as long as you read through this carefully it doesn't matter when you read this :)
Let's start with the London lunch scalp. A lot of people haven't seen the post because it was posted at a non US friendly time. I'll link it here if you are interested before we get into detail.
Post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/h9f4q8/cable_scalp_london_lunch_session_the_red_line/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x
So the reason for this entry came from the M15 Chart and you will see why I only take 10 pips and then out immediately.

London Lunch M15 Chart
What you are looking at here is the last up close candle before this "major" dump. What's important tho is that price also immediately went back up and traded over this candle. Now we just wait for price to dip into the red square and we have our free 10 pips. As you see shortly after price went lower so be careful with your target. On HTF if you see something like this it is more likely to give you more pips. Always keep in mind we are on M15/ a LTF so we target conservative!

M1 London Lunch Chart
Just to complete the explanation, here's the M1 chart. Red line was the TP. Square Entry as explained.

Most people probably seen the NY video but I will also link it here.
Post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/h9i9gf/another_ny_session_another_10_pips_i_messed_up/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x
The other scalp was made in NY and blew up way more. A lot of discussion, questions and accusing of gambling haha as usual. So what's special about this trade... it was my first trade I guess that was purely based of the M1 TF and not like a higher TF candle. Let's look into it.
M1 NY Session Chart
So this is unusual for my chart so many lines/squares ^^ So let's get started from top to bottom. Just a quick mention the two horizontal red lines are entry and TP.
  1. The diagonal line on the top is only there to visualize that the highs are not equal this is the first sign of bearishness.
  2. Red square: Wick of the last down close candle before price shoots up. The wick after price came back down is now seen as a bearish level so if price trades there I look for short entries.
  3. Blue Line: Bodys of the previous low. Candles closed below that line confirming that the low will be broken any time. Price went back up a little and I immediately took action on that. 2 Minutes later price showed me that my levels are accurate and I don't need to FOMO. I should have been patient, so I learned something from this trade!
This wraps up the teaching of my monday scalps!
I might not post tomorrow since I'll not be home and screen recording might be to stressful. We'll see.
Cheers!
submitted by Flotschgee to Forex [link] [comments]

One of my favourite ways to enter a trade - what market makers do

Hey Forex. Been a while since I've made an actual post. I still think 90%+ of the posts in here are a toxic wasteland, unfortunately. That being said, I wanted to share one of my entry tips with all of you. This is especially helpful given the dramatic increase in volatility we have seen across the currency markets.
This isn't technical, there's no magic chart pattern or indicator. Rather, it is a concept. From what I've seen posted here, a common struggle is "where and how do I enter the trade?". This is a big question... and it can separate the analysts from the traders. How often have you had a view that xxx/xxx is going up/down and in fact... it does just that? The only problem is, you weren't onboard the trade. You either missed out entirely, or you chased it and bought the high/sold the low.
The title for this post isn't just clickbait, this is in fact what market makers do. I have to emphasize this point once more, this is NOT a technical strategy. It is a different perspective on risk management that the retail crowd is largely unfamiliar with. I'm going to use point form to cover this concept from now on:
Don't (DO NOT DO THESE THINGS):
- Think of your entry as an all-or-nothing proposition
- Think that you must shoot your entire shot all at once
- That there's a perfect point at which you must pull the trigger, and if you miss this point then you miss the trade
Do:
- Split your risk allocation for a specific idea into different parts (for example if you want to risk $100,000 notional value on a USD/JPY trade, split your entry into 4 parts. Maybe that means each tranche is 25k, maybe it means that you go 10k, 20k, 30k, 40k)
- Be a scale down buyer and a scale up seller
- Pick bands in which you want to take action. For example if you think USD/JPY is a buy from 108.5 to 110, then pick a band in which you will be a buyer. Maybe it is between 108.5 and 108. That gives you a lot of room to stack orders (whether these are limits or market orders is up to you). The best case scenario is that all your orders get filled, and you have a fantastic overall average price point. The worst case scenario (other than simply being wrong) is that only your initial order is filled and price starts running away. Remember, you'll always be too light when it is going your way and too heavy when it is going in your face.
- This also works on the way out when you want to exit. You can scale out of the trade, just as you scaled into it.
This takes a lot of pressure off in terms of "sniping" an entry. I hear that term a lot, and it drives me crazy. Unless I'm hedging my options in the spot and I'm scalping for small points here and there, I'm not looking for a "sniper" entry. I'm looking for structural plays. Other hedge funds, banks, central banks, they're not dumping their entire load all at once.
This approach allows you to spread your risk out across a band rather than being pigeonholed into picking a perfect level. It allows you to improve your dollar-cost average with clearly defined risk parameters. Unless you are consistently getting perfect entries with zero drawdown, this method just makes so much sense. The emotional benefit is incredible, as you don't have to worry about the price moving against you. Obviously you pick a stop where your idea is simply wrong, but otherwise this should help you remain (more) relaxed.
submitted by ParallaxFX to Forex [link] [comments]

The Power Of 20 Pips (Forex Scalping Strategy) - YouTube My SIMPLE and PROFITABLE Forex Scalping Strategy EXPLAINED ... What is Scalping? - YouTube WHAT IS SCALPING? PART 1 🔨 - YouTube SIMPLE and PROFITABLE Forex Scalping Strategy! - YouTube

Scalping Forex for a living can be achieved when a trader is able to implement a profitable forex scalping strategy, like the 1 minute scalping strategy. The powerful 1 min scalping system combined with the Stop Loss allows scalpers to minimise their risk in Forex trading. Choose the best Forex pairs to scalp and stick to the strategy. Forex scalping is a popular method involving the quick opening and liquidation of positions. The term “quick” is imprecise, but it is generally meant to define a timeframe of about 3-5 minutes at most, while most scalpers will maintain their positions for as little as one minute. Forex scalping is a method of trading where the trader typically makes multiple trades each day, trying to profit off small price movements. Forex scalping is a type of forex trading strategy. In this guide we discuss the ins and outs of forex scalping and what you should know. Forex scalping is a method of trading where the trader typically makes multiple trades each day, trying to profit off small price movements.

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The Power Of 20 Pips (Forex Scalping Strategy) - YouTube

Hey guys here is me showing you my 20 pip scalps and that you really don't need to make hundreds of pips to be a profitable forex trader. If you want to lear... Scalping is a simple trading strategy that allows you to minimize the chances ... Want to learn more about scalping? Check out my webinar https://goo.gl/ds8Ngn. Scalping is a short-term trading style, where a trader looks to take small but frequent profits out of the market. Here we explain how it works. Subscribe: h... Join our Trading Room where we discuss All Things Forex on a daily basis: https://bit.ly/2NLxbsa In today's video, I will explain my SIMPLE and PROFITABLE fo... Scalping for me is a day trading style where you're holding something from 30 sec to 10 min. You're looking for 10 or 20 pips - maybe even 5 pips per trade. I'm not talking about day trading over...

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